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Joe Wallace Reception/Artist Talk | Day After Yesterday : Portrait of Dementia

January 24 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Free – $10
man holding face

We are thrilled to invite you to join us for a poignant, beautiful look at and conversation with opens in a new windowJoe Wallace and his series, opens in a new windowDay After Yesterday now hanging in the Lafayette City Center Passageway in downtown Boston.

Join us on Sunday January 24th at 4pm for a conversation with Joe about his series and the beautiful portraits of people he has framed with his lens.

This event is FREE to Griffin Members. Not a Member? Get more opens in a new windowinformation about our Membership levels.

About Day After Yesterday 

n 2020, 50 million people are living with dementia globally. In the United States, one in three seniors suffer with Alzheimer’s or dementia at the time of their death. The US government, through Medicare and Medicaid, will spend approximately $305 billion annually to care for people with Alzheimer’s and dementia. There is an additional $250 billion shouldered by family members and unpaid caregivers. Six million people in the US have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. It’s estimated that only 1 in 4 people with the disease are diagnosed which means it’s possible that 24 million people in the US are living with dementia.

And yet despite the millions of individuals and families affected, dementia is often a taboo subject with limited public awareness or discourse. A diagnosis can become a mechanism for segregating those affected from society, making it easy to see only the label instead of the individual.

The typical narrative about dementia tends to focus on the clinical diagnosis or medical status of an individual, and is all too often depicted using fear, despair and vulnerability. This narrow and incomplete view of dementia quickly becomes a powerful means to distance oneself from their humanity. By focusing only on the narrowest of views, that narrative does little to change the stigma of those living with the disease. In many ways, showing the stereotypical perspectives only makes it easier to continue ignoring the burgeoning health crisis and the individuals themselves.

The goal of this [body of work] is to de-stigmatize those living with dementia. To use empathy as a means for connection and understanding. To tell a more complex and complete story of those living with the disease and its affect on their families and loved ones.

To give the audience courage to act in ways large and small, you must  show the whole story – the fear, loss and despair, but also the love, connection, dignity, and powerful humanity that always remain – in the subjects, in the care-partners, and in the families and communities. That is the only path to evolve the narrative and have a positive social change.

About Joe Wallace

Trained as a journalist, Joe Wallace has been a portrait photographer and storyteller for twenty years. Like many, Joe has a deeply personal connection with dementia. His maternal grandfather and hero, Joe Jenkins, had Alzheimer’s. His maternal grandmother Elizabeth Ponder (Bebe) had vascular dementia. And in recent years, his mother Barbara has begun her journey with the disease.

Joe was frustrated by the common, one-dimensional narrative of dementia – futility, despair, and loss. These are real and important elements of the dementia journey, but by focusing only on the narrowest of views, do very little to change the stigma of those living with the disease. In many ways, showing the stereotypical perspectives only makes it easier to continue ignoring the burgeoning health crisis and the individuals themselves.

Joe feels strongly that to give the audience courage to act in ways large and small, you must to show the whole story. The artist must not be afraid to show not only the fear, loss and despair, but also the love, connection, dignity, and powerful humanity that always remain – in the subjects, in the care-partners, and in the families and communities. That is the only path to evolve the narrative and have a positive social change.

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Details

Date:
January 24
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Cost:
Free – $10
Event Categories:
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Venue

The Griffin Museum of Photography
67 Shore Road
Winchester, Ma 01890 United States
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Phone:
781-729-1158

All sales are final on products purchased through the Griffin Museum. Participant cancellation of a program/lecture/class will result in a full refund only if notice of cancellation is given at least 2 weeks before the date of the event.